Bloggy Goodnes: Record Day Ambassador Jack White

We love the fact that over the last five years, Record Store Day has become a runaway success, thanks in part to loads of special and exclusive releases specially designed to get music fans out to brick and mortar stores. In anticipation of its sixth year, which will take place on Saturday, April 20th, the organization has named Jack White as this year’s official Record Store Day Ambassador. White, who owns and operates Third Man Records in Nashville, posted a fantastic must-read note on Record Store Day’s official website, where he urges people to stop relying on technology and to go out and see a film in a theater, or visit a bookstore and most importantly to go to a record store because  they are “selling discs full of soul that you haven’t felt yet.”

In addition to his statement White also had a bit of fun with his newly anointed ambassadorship, posting this video of him giving of tour of Nashville’s vinyl pressing plant United Record Pressing…

Finally, it’s been roughly six years since we’ve heard anything in the way of new music from Rilo Kiley. The indie-rock act, who according to front woman Jenny Lewis never “officially broke-up”, will release RKives-  a 16-track collection of rarities, B-sides and unreleased songs on April 2. The Los Angeles-based band is now reaching out to their fans to help to create the music video for the album’s lead single – Let Me Back In (which is currently streaming on Spin) by asking them “to upload your favorite personal Rilo Kiley video clip, band footage, created animation, etc… whatever you have in moving pictures that you’d like to share with us.” Submissions will be accepted until March 5, at RiloKiley.com.

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2 thoughts on “Bloggy Goodnes: Record Day Ambassador Jack White

  1. marshmeli Reply

    Love that Jack is saying, but when he says “stop relying on technology and to go out and see a film in a theater” 90% of theaters (if not more I would assume) are all relying on technology to “screen” the film, gone is film, most films are sent via hard drive to theaters or they download a heavily DRMed video file from a secure server. Studios are no longer evening lending film prints out to schools and film societies…the love of vinyl is older technology is coming back slowly, but at a nice rate, we need the same for film.

    /rant

  2. marshmeli Reply

    Also Jack is spot-on when he says this: “…no comparison to a 70mm showing of a film in a gorgeous theater” Doing that is a great experience for sure.

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