Briefly: Phish’s Time Turns Elastic on iTunes

When a band releases their first single in nearly five years they usually tell their fans, but when does Phish do anything by the book? Last night a version of the Trey Anastasio-penned 13 minute suite Time Turns Elastic – recorded recently in New York City by the quartet for their new album produced by Steve Lilywhite – was put up for sale on iTunes, but the only way you’d know is if you happened to be searching the iTunes store for Phish or you caught wind of the release on a message board.

Have you downloaded the track? Let us know what you think…

UPDATE (11:19AM): Phish.com has been updated with the video above and a news item about this new single that includes word that the as-of-yet-untitled new album will drop on July 28th.

Share:  

Related Posts

38 thoughts on “Briefly: Phish’s Time Turns Elastic on iTunes

  1. semuam Reply

    LOL at Billy Breathes being their best album. Billy Breathes is uninspired. Their best albums are Rift and Nectar.

  2. A.H. Reply

    It’s brilliant. The song acts as the climb for the explosive drop at the end (11:15). Any loyal Phan or average Joe should be able to hear the song as it truly is. Production wise – the vocals are crisp and full of enthusiasm, the drums, bass, piano and guitar are perfectly placed in the stereo picture. The overall mix is thickly layered but in no way overbearing. Band wise – the playing has gotten more mature and stronger. The personal growth of all four musicians both separately and collectively has resulted in this incredibly sublime interplay.

    Sure when I first heard it I wasn’t overly impressed, but later when I wasn’t busy and I threw away my expectations I popped on a pair of nice headphones, closed my eyes, and really let myself fall into the sound. All of the above, and much more, became apparent. Do as I did, give it a TRUE second chance – listen with an open mind and open ears. These guys deserve way more credit for creating something wonderful to add to there already awesome repertoire.

  3. christian Reply

    well said A.H.

  4. Mikey P Reply

    Meh. I HATED this at first listen. After forcing myself to listen 3 or 4 more times, it grew on me. It does have a prog-rock feel, almost like early Genesis in parts. But some of those lyrics, Trey, come on man. Bleeding sky and calling out to melody. Its like crappy high school poetry.

  5. Alex Hall Reply

    I’m glad to see some people discussing their impressions of “Time Turns Elastic.” I wondered what the reception would be, and I get the sense that much of what is being said–both praise and criticism–is accurate. I have officially gotten hooked on the song, though that might just be because I have listened to it enough times now for it to get stuck in my head, so I keep playing it over and over. I feel like much of the song is contrived, that is, that it was written with the intention of being “epic” or whatever, though Trey’s statements about the song contradict this. Still, there are pieces of the song that I like–especially the bit where Trey belts out: “But all around/streaming down/rays of blue light/calling out.” That’s some of the most progressive stuff I’ve ever heard from this band, like something you might hear from Yes or something. In any event, there are bits of this song that I think are excellent, and even with the sections that feel contrived to me, this is some of the best stuff to come from Phish in a long time studio-wise. One other point I might make: there isn’t a long-ish guitar solo (i.e. just Trey–there are instrumental sections featuring the guitar, but no improv-style stuff that I hear, though I’m sure they’ll play around with it live), which speaks to the camaraderie of the band in their new state of mind. That’s damn promising. I mean, I love Trey’s sort of noodling, LOVE it. But it’s nice to hear a composition rather than some loose idea fleshed out for the recording. Thoughts?

  6. Alex Hall Reply

    Actually, I mentioned Yes in my comment, but I think Mikey P had it right when he mentioned Genesis, a lot of this does sound like Genesis–like something right off /A Trick of the Tail/. I wonder if Trey’s been listening to that. Wouldn’t surprise me one bit.

  7. Bill Reply

    Terrible!

  8. Pingback: Briefly: Phish’s Time Turns Elastic on iTunes < It’s all about the trends |

  9. Scootarooni Reply

    Makes sense to cite Genesis. Early Phish often sounded like early Genesis: (beginning of YEM, middle of Squirming Coil…)

    Not sure if I like TTE yet, but it’s better than most of Round Room and Undermind…

  10. chris Reply

    oh yea. Please perform every night!

  11. exphishphan Reply

    I love the naivete, excitement of discovery, and complete disregard for what is considered “cool” that is present in the original recordings of songs like “YEM”, “Lizards”, “Mockingbird” (pretty much all of “Gamehenge”), “Fluffhead”, “Reba” and “Squirming Coil”. I love the way those Zappa Hot Rats, Pink Floyd, early Yes and early Genesis influences come out. There’s a weird sort of mystical nerdiness to it all.
    After Phish got all self-conscious w/ “Nectar”‘s annoying patchwork of genres, I felt that much of the magic had disappeared, and despite spirited efforts here and there w/ “Breathes”, “Ghost” (“Guyute” is fucking awesome) and even “Round Room” (I think I’m one of the only people out there that really kinda liked the rawness, immediacy and soul-searching of that album), the magic never really came back. “Hoist”, “Farmhouse”, “Undermind”, and even much of “Breathes” were simply awful; they were trying to be “cool” – something they weren’t and will never be. I’m sorry Trey, but you will never write the “perfect pop song”; you were onto something way cooler when you penned “The Curtain” out in the woods…
    This is why I like” Time Turns Elastic”. It’s pretty damn dorky, to the point of being almost ridiculous. But it also has a soul and beauty to it in that strange, old-Phishy way. There’s something kind of theatrical about the way it develops, too (the end part really reminds me of “Hair” for some reason), which only adds to the nerd factor… Shit, anything to move them away from the post-Grateful Dead-pseudo hippy-kind veggie burrito-hemp necklace-baseball cap-wearing frat boy-glow stick war bullshit that comprises the Phish scene. I’m betting that this song will grow on most of you in an unexpected way. The “epicness” of it will start to seem less contrived and more genuinely dorky, irreverent, and heartfelt.
    Stay weird, Phish, even to the weirdos!

  12. exphishphan Reply

    Easier-to-read version:

    I love the naivete, excitement of discovery, and complete disregard for what is considered “cool” that is present in the original recordings of songs like “YEM”, “Lizards”, “Mockingbird” (pretty much all of “Gamehenge”), “Fluffhead”, “Reba” and “Squirming Coil”. I love the way those Zappa Hot Rats, Pink Floyd, early Yes and early Genesis influences come out. There’s a weird sort of mystical nerdiness to it all.
    After Phish got all self-conscious w/ “Nectar”‘s annoying patchwork of genres, I felt that much of the magic had disappeared, and despite spirited efforts here and there w/ “Breathes”, “Ghost” (“Guyute” is fucking awesome) and even “Round Room” (I think I’m one of the only people out there that really kinda liked the rawness, immediacy and soul-searching of that album), the magic never really came back. “Hoist”, “Farmhouse”, “Undermind”, and even much of “Breathes” were simply awful; they were trying to be “cool” – something they weren’t and will never be. I’m sorry Trey, but you will never write the “perfect pop song”; you were onto something way cooler when you penned “The Curtain” out in the woods…
    This is why I like” Time Turns Elastic”. It’s pretty damn dorky, to the point of being almost ridiculous. But it also has a soul and beauty to it in that strange, old-Phishy way. There’s something kind of theatrical about the way it develops, too (the end part really reminds me of “Hair” for some reason), which only adds to the nerd factor… Shit, anything to move them away from the post-Grateful Dead-pseudo hippy-kind veggie burrito-hemp necklace-baseball cap-wearing frat boy-glow stick war bullshit that comprises the Phish scene. I’m betting that this song will grow on most of you in an unexpected way. The “epicness” of it will start to seem less contrived and more genuinely dorky, irreverent, and heartfelt.
    Stay weird, Phish, even to the weirdos!

  13. exphishphan Reply

    I’ll try that again…

    I love the naivete, excitement of discovery, and complete disregard for what is considered “cool” that is present in the original recordings of songs like “YEM”, “Lizards”, “Mockingbird” (pretty much all of “Gamehenge”), “Fluffhead”, “Reba” and “Squirming Coil”. I love the way those Zappa Hot Rats, Pink Floyd, early Yes and early Genesis influences come out. There’s a weird sort of mystical nerdiness to it all.

    After Phish got all self-conscious w/ “Nectar”’s annoying patchwork of genres, I felt that much of the magic had disappeared, and despite spirited efforts here and there w/ “Breathes”, “Ghost” (”Guyute” is fucking awesome) and even “Round Room” (I think I’m one of the only people out there that really kinda liked the rawness, immediacy and soul-searching of that album), the magic never really came back. “Hoist”, “Farmhouse”, “Undermind”, and even much of “Breathes” were simply awful; they were trying to be “cool” – something they weren’t and will never be. I’m sorry Trey, but you will never write the “perfect pop song”; you were onto something way cooler when you penned “The Curtain” out in the woods…

    This is why I like” Time Turns Elastic”. It’s pretty damn dorky, to the point of being almost ridiculous. But it also has a soul and beauty to it in that strange, old-Phishy way. There’s something kind of theatrical about the way it develops, too (the end part really reminds me of “Hair” for some reason), which only adds to the nerd factor… Shit, anything to move them away from the post-Grateful Dead-pseudo hippy-kind veggie burrito-hemp necklace-baseball cap-wearing frat boy-glow stick war bullshit that comprises the Phish scene. I’m betting that this song will grow on most of you in an unexpected way. The “epicness” of it will start to seem less contrived and more genuinely dorky, irreverent, and heartfelt.

    Stay weird, Phish, even to the weirdos!

Leave A Response